Well, this was fun.

popculturebrain:

Full Trailer: ‘Interstellar' - Nov 7

Written by Jonathan and Christopher Nolan, directed by Christopher Nolan, starring Matthew McConaughey, Anne Hathaway, Michael Caine, Jessica Chastain, Wes Bentley, William Devane, Topher Grace, John Lithgow, Ellen Burstyn and Mackenzie Foy.

I like the idea of Nolan taking on environmentalism and space, but this feels like one of his most conventional films to date. There must be something else going on here that we’re not seeing. It’s very possible this is only covering the first act or part of the film.

Recounting the last few Nolan movies — and I’m really only going back as far as TDK and relying solely on memory — it seems like there’s been a stark plot shift you didn’t see coming because you couldn’t glean it from the trailers. 

Dark Knight's trailers focused solely on the Joker and pretty much left out the whole Harvey Dent B-plot. Obviously, you knew the character was in the movie and what was possibly coming, but the Dent transformation was central to the last 45 minutes of that movie and was totally absent from previews.

Inception was essentially two movies. The trailer had to be beefy on exposition due to the foreign nature of the subject material, and it was basically Leonardo DiCaprio showing Ellen Page his craft. This was the first Inception: an origin story about DiCaprio as psychological hitman/consultant, cheating out to the audience to explain his craft while recruiting a team for one last go-round at the service of Ken Watanabe. The second Inception started when they incepted Cillian Murphy, and while they showed scenes from this in trailers because they were aesthetically gripping (JGL anti-gravity fighting, the snow fort), we had pretty much no idea what to make of them until we got proper context during the movie.

TDKR followed in its predecessor’s footsteps by (obviously) leaving out everything about Talia al Ghul and everything in the movie that didn’t have to do with Bane being a scary scary monster man trying to blow up the Pittsburgh Steelers. 

The Interstellar trailer seems to be cut from the Inception cloth. Matthew McConaughey is seemingly being recruited to help humanity colonize somewhere in deep space and has to leave his kids behind to do so, presumably in order to see his kids again. Leonardo DiCaprio was being recruited to help stop Cillian Murphy’s company from destroying free-market competition (I think?????) and had to leave the memory of his dead wife behind to do so … in order to see is kids again.

Both trailers showed snippets of the flashy stuff, but leave out the meat and potatoes of essentially what is going to make(/made) the movie. Inception was one movie that told a singular story from start to finish, but hid an origin story in its first act and really became what it was once they got on that plane. Interstellar will presumably tell a singular story from start to finish, but it will hide an origin story in its first act and really become what it is once McConaughey goes to space.

I have gay friends and we have great relationships when it comes down to respecting each other,” he said. “It’s not something you choose to be. It’s not like, ‘I want to be a baseball player,’ or, ‘I want to be a basketball player.’ It’s something you’re born with and everybody needs to accept that. Hey, look, the way I see things, I love people the way they are. Especially if you are honest with yourself. You know what I’m saying? It’s the (expletive) 21st century man. Get over it.

David effing Ortiz

(via Boston Herald)

Hey Don Draper, how do you feel about all the Olympians adopting stray dogs in Sochi?

popculturebrain:

Microreview: ‘The Lego Movie’
Phil Lord and Chris Miller’s batting average is kind of insane right now. They’ve presented an astounding comedic body of work, across formats and target audiences, that rivals any of their peers (Rogen & Goldberg, Judd Apatow, Pixar). ‘Lego Movie,’ while family fare, is so much more complicated than it lets on and often caters more directly to the adults in the audience than the children. Themes of freedom and oppression, individual expression and totalitarian conformity, corporate media and big government dominance are especially resonant up against the modern world. They also go about as far over the kids’ head as the meta humor that the movie (SPOILER ALERTS FROM HERE) builds its entire climax on.
Speaking of which, the third act reveal is a bit wonky and jarring. It unfortunately calls attention to itself and the rules of this world. In ‘Toy Story’ you understand the system of how the toys live when they’re not being watched, but here the mechanics of the Lego world and the real world are muddled and distracting. That said, the climax of the movie works, and stirs up genuine emotion, even with characters we don’t really know much about. Or maybe we do and have been getting to know them the entire time? 

popculturebrain:

Microreview: ‘The Lego Movie’

Phil Lord and Chris Miller’s batting average is kind of insane right now. They’ve presented an astounding comedic body of work, across formats and target audiences, that rivals any of their peers (Rogen & Goldberg, Judd Apatow, Pixar). ‘Lego Movie,’ while family fare, is so much more complicated than it lets on and often caters more directly to the adults in the audience than the children. Themes of freedom and oppression, individual expression and totalitarian conformity, corporate media and big government dominance are especially resonant up against the modern world. They also go about as far over the kids’ head as the meta humor that the movie (SPOILER ALERTS FROM HERE) builds its entire climax on.

Speaking of which, the third act reveal is a bit wonky and jarring. It unfortunately calls attention to itself and the rules of this world. In ‘Toy Story’ you understand the system of how the toys live when they’re not being watched, but here the mechanics of the Lego world and the real world are muddled and distracting. That said, the climax of the movie works, and stirs up genuine emotion, even with characters we don’t really know much about. Or maybe we do and have been getting to know them the entire time? 

A few words about Jimmy Fallon

The first mix CD I made, with the first computer I ever had with a built-in CD burner, was embarrassing. There’s not much on it that I’m not ashamed of as a 23-year-old, if I could even remember half the songs that represented my musical taste as a sixth-grader.

But there are two tracks I vividly remember, probably because they’re the only tracks from “Jordan’s Mix #1” that have survived my evolving (lol) taste in music to have maintained a foothold in my library in 2014. They were two Jimmy Fallon Weekend Update parodies, one a few riffs on “The Phantom Menace” from 1999 (as a guest on Colin Quinn’s update desk!) and the other a few ditties about the 2002 Winter Olympics.

I don’t listen to them much anymore, but I like to remind myself every so often that they’re still there on my phone and computer, always ready for me. And tonight, more than any other night, it’s supremely important for me to remind myself of the 15-year “Point A to Point B” path Jimmy Fallon’s career has taken, and just how significant it is.

This isn’t to say “Hey, I got in on the Jimmy Fallon ground floor as an 11-year-old, so fuck you and your bandwagoning!” It is a little bit for me to brag/reflect about Jimmy being my first favorite comedian, the brightest star of SNL when pre-pubescent me, the middle child of a pop-culture-obsessed family, starting watching the show. It’s also about how my brothers and I used to watch his “Best of” DVD incessantly, about how I valiantly tried to amuse my friends with my best Z105 morning drive and Boston Sully impressions, about how I could listen to those silly parodies ad nauseam and still find them inventive and hilarious.

But mostly, this is just me thinking out loud about how fitting it is that Fallon is taking over The Tonight Show, and how resonant his comedy has been with me as I’ve made the trek from childhood to adulthood. I was too young to be cynical about his “annoying” impishness on SNL, always quick to defend his mid-skit crack-ups as just being human, and as appreciative of his own comedy as I was. 

Then Fallon did some growing up, and so did I. He had his “movie career” and I had high school. When his Late Night premiere coincided with my freshman year of college, that too seemed perfect. Lorne Michaels was confidently throwing him into the deep end, while on a totally different scale, Binghamton University provided a deep end of its own for me.

And now, as he coasts into career adulthood, and I into just adulthood, I’m compelled to reflect and look forward. Whether or not he’ll be the “next Carson” or unite the late-night viewing contingent is irrelevant. What matters is this person who had such a prominent place in my childhood, adolescence and young-adulthood is now someone I’ll get to enjoy adulthood with as he enjoys his.

So I’ll be tuning in to The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon tonight, and for as many nights as I can for as long as this crazy thing is happening.

popculturebrain:

Watch: Jimmy Fallon’s Winter Olympics songs from ‘SNL' circa 2002

It’s still not easy to downhill ski.

(ht @jordanrab)

Yep.

yahoosports:

Costas Eye Watch, Day 5: Code Pink.
(photos via Getty Images, @stvnmacias, @dkitendaugh)

Seriously, if you’re not with Yahoo for all your Olympics coverage, you are missing out.

yahoosports:

Costas Eye Watch, Day 5: Code Pink.

(photos via Getty Images, @stvnmacias, @dkitendaugh)

Seriously, if you’re not with Yahoo for all your Olympics coverage, you are missing out.